ROSIE BANS-BE BOLD.

ROSIE BANS-BE BOLD.

At this time of the year in Scotland, everyone involved in the music industry’s thoughts turns to the Scottish Album Of The Year Award. It’s Scotland’s premier award. So, it’s with baited breath that artists all over Scotland await the announce of the long-list of twenty albums. The long-list then becomes a shortlist of ten. Then at a glittering award ceremony in June, the great and good of the Scottish music industry gather for the announcement of the Scottish Album Of The Year Award. The next day, the search begins for Scottish music’s next big thing. 

What follows is a search for the latest unsigned artists who might, be at future Scottish Album Of The Year Award ceremonies. This could include one of the best unsigned Scottish artists, Rosie Bans, who has just released her debut E.P. Be Bold. It’s the introduction to one of Scotland’s best kept musical secrets. 

Not for much long. Glasgow born Rosie Bans is determined to make a name as a singer and songwriter. That’s why she moved South to London, seeking fame and fortune. So, far Glasgow and London audiences have been won over by Rosie. Her music and trademark banter have won friends and influenced people in London. No wonder, given the quality of Rosie’s songs.

Her songs are slick, melodic and hook-laden. They’re also variously heartfelt confessionals, complex, emotive, honest, soul searching, subtle and beautiful. Rosie writes songs that tell stories. She introduces you to a cast of characters. You empathise with them, share their pain, hurt, stories and lives. That’s the case on Be Bold, where Rosie sits down with her trusty piano and  backing band lays bare her soul.

Opening the Be Bold E.P. is Arguments. Scorching, Led Zeppelin licks grab your attention. They join forces with the rhythm section in delivering a musical curveball. It’s a scene setter. In struts Rosie’s feisty vocal. It’s enveloped by scorching guitars, driving rhythm section and piano. Harmonies flit in and out the gloriously rocky arrangement. Later, the arrangement becomes jazz-tinged, before returning to its rocky norm. This is the perfect backdrop for Rosie’s vocal on this tale of a relationship gone wrong. Emotive, feisty and full of frustration, what an introduction to Rosie Bans.

Make Believe is very different to the previous track. Jazz-tinged describes the piano lead arrangement. Drums signal the arrival of Rosie’s vocal as she delivers a vocal tour de force. She’s lonely and alone, before her vocal becomes sassy and needy. It’s soft and tender, cascading above the arrangement. Drums, piano and cooing harmonies combine. Rosie’s vocal is breathy, ethereal and akin to an emotive confessional.

Bold Light has a slow, lush and atmospheric introduction. Vibes accompany Rosie’s vocal on a song that could be autobiographical. She recently moved to London, from Glasgow, her hometown. In the song, she’s lonely, confused and uncertain. She doesn’t alone, doesn’t know who she is any more and understandably, wants to go home to her old life. She wells up, emotion filling her vocal. Meanwhile, the punchy arrangement meanders alone, before becoming jaunty as Rosie lays bare her soul with a soulful vocal.

Westbound Ghosts closes the Be Bold E.P. It’s a homecoming song of sorts. Accompanied by the piano, Rosie sings about travelling up the east coast “to a place that I feel most fits like home,” By then, drums are providing the heartbeat and strings have swept in and are sweeping the arrangement along. Rosie paints pictures. There’s a sense of joy and trepidation about her homecoming. Her new and old lives are very different. Then a thunderous drum signals Rosie to kick loose. She unleashes a vocal powerhouse and ensures the song swings. Her jazzy vocal is a joy to behold. Especially when strings sweep and swirl and the jaunty piano and drums accompany here. It’s an irresistible, hook-laden fusion of jazz and pop from Rosie Bans.

Recently, Rosie Bans was hailed one of the best unsigned singers in Britain. That’s definitely the case. Rosie is a hugely talented singer and songwriter. The four tracks on Be Bold are a tantalising taste of what Rosie Bans is capable of. 

On the four tracks on Be Bold, Rosie combines jazz, pop and soul. Rosie’s songs are slick, melodic and full of hooks. They’re also heartfelt confessionals. The songs are variously complex, emotive, honest, soul searching, subtle and beautiful. Rosie writes songs that tell stories. She introduces you to a cast of characters. You empathise with them, share their pain, hurt, stories and lives. That’s the case on Be Bold, which Rosie Bans will be showcasing on her forthcoming tour.

Hopefully, during Rosie Bans forthcoming tour, it won’t just be music fans that will be at each show. Hopefully, so will a whole host of A&R reps wanting to sign Rosie Bans. Having heard Be Bold, they’ll be wanting to add Rosie to their roster. No wonder.  She’s an artist with a huge future. Be Bold is proof of that and is why it won’t be long until Rosie Bans is signed to a record company. After that, we’ll be hearing a lot more from Rosie Bans.

ROSIE BANS-BE BOLD.

cover

bebold-cd-back-final

 

2 Comments

  1. Derek – thank you so much for this absolutely amazing review. I am eternally thankful and incredibly honoured you took the time and energy to listen and write such awesome things!! Take care! Rosie xxxxxxxxx

    • Hi Rosie,

      Glad you liked my review of Be Bold. It’s a fantastic E.P. I’m looking forward to the followup already. Good luck with your career.

      Take care,
      Derek

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: