HORSE MEAT DISCO VOLUME IV.

HORSE MEAT DISCO VOLUME IV.

It’s been a long time coming, Horse Meat Disco Volume IV. Three years, but hey, who’s counting. At last, though, the wait is nearly over. Horse Meat Disco Volume IV will be released on Strut Records on 16th June. A lot has happened in the last three years.

Since the release of Horse Meat Disco Volume III, the Horse Meat Disco collective have been spreading their unique brand of disco worldwide. This includes mainland Europe and North America. Despite their globe-trotting lifestyle, the Horse Meat Disco guys still maintain their monthly residences at The Eagle in London’s Vauxhall and at Prince Charles’ in Berlin. The Horse Meat Disco collective must be, the hard working men in disco. However, despite their gruelling schedule, recently, the Horse Meat Disco guys touched base.

When Jim Stanton, James Hillard, Luke Howard and Severino joined forces, It was a case of the boys are back in town. They’d picked sixteen tracks for their mix on disc one of Horse Meat Disco Volume IV. The result was a seamless and flawless mix. It features everyone from OPAL, K.S.B, The Sunburst Band, King Sporty and The Root Rockers, Phreek Plus One, Winners, Rena, Laura Taylor, Joey Negro Vs. Horse Meat Disco and Camouflage. Then there’s disc two of Horse Meat Disco Volume IV to enjoy.

Just like previous volumes of Horse Meat Disco, disc two of Horse Meat Disco Volume IV features full length tracks. This time, disc two of Horse Meat Disco Volume IV features twelve full length tracks. Four of these tracks are remixes. This includes the Special Club Mix of OPAL’s  Ain’t No Way, the Funked Over Mix of Shahid Mustaf MC’s Getting To Know MC and the Horse Meat Disco Mix of Joey Negro Vs. Horse Meat Disco’s Candidate For Love. Then there’s the sampled version Cleavage’s Barah. The Horse Meat Disco collective have dug deep for Horse Meat Disco Volume IV, which I’ll tell you about.

The only way to describe disc one of Horse Meat Disco Volume IV is seamless and flawless. Mind you, Horse Meat Disco have been doing this a long time. Since 2003, to be precise. That’s when Jim Stanton, James Hillard, Severino and Filthy Luka, have been putting on their legendary Horse Meat Disco club nights in London. They’re now based in The Eagle in Islington, but take their club nights around the world, allowing other people to experience the now famous Horse Meat Disco club nights. To allow everyone to experience what their club nights sound like, they release their first compilation, Horse Meat Disco in 2009. 

When Horse Meat Disco was released in 2009, it was a double album. The format was the same the same. Disco one featured fifteen tracks mixed by Horse Meat Disco, while disc two featured twelve tracks. Released to critical acclaim, Horse Meat Disco’s fusion of boogie, disco and electro. Hidden gems, rarities and classics sat side-by-side. So, it’s no surprise that Horse Meat Disco was hailed as one of 2009s best compilations.  A year later, came Horse Meat Disco Volume 2.

Horse Meat Disco Volume 2 was released in 2010. Again, the Horse Meat Disco collective’s musical taste was impeccable. Familiar faces, classics and rarities were seamlessly mixed by Horse Meat Disco. Critics hailed the release of Horse Meat Disco Volume 2. It was perceived as a worth followup to Horse Meat Disco. The only difference was the format. Horse Meat Disco 2 wasn’t a double album. Instead, Horse Meat Disco Volume 2 was flawlessly mixed by Horse Meat Disco, while the full length version of the tracks were available via a free download. However, Horse Meat Disco III saw a return to the tried and tested double album.

For Horse Meat Disco Volume III, the Horse Meat Disco guys had dug deep. Idris Muhammad sat side-by-side with Sylvester, The Salsoul Orchestra, Tambi, Marcel King, Gene Chandler and even Wham. Released in July 2011, Horse Meat Disco Volume III was hailed as the best in the series so far. It was going to take a lot to top Horse Meat Disco III. However, if anyone can, Horse Meat Disco can. Especially with a compilation the quality of Horse Meat Disco Volume IV.

DISC ONE.

From the opening bars of OPAL’s Ain’t No Way, it’s obvious that the Horse Meat Disco guys are determined to get the party started on Horse Meat Disco Volume IV. Seamlessly, the mix into K.S.B. Misaluba, then The Sunburst Band’s Taste The Groove and Valery Allington’s Stop. Their programming is perfect. They drop the right song at the right moment. Proof of this is L’Amour featuring Krystal’s Let’s Make Love Tonight. 

L’Amour is a glorious slice of vocal disco. Quite simply, it’s the perfect track at the perfect time. So is Go To Work, a collaboration between J. Boogie’s Dubtronic Science featuring The Pimps Of Joytime. Joyous, funky and soulful, it’s full of poppy hooks. It’s real hands in the air music. Still, Horse Meat Disco’s mixing is seamless and flawless, just like their programming skills. There’s only one problem, how do you follow a track like Go To Work? 

In Horse Meat Disco’s case that’s quite simple. They spin Winners Get Ready For The Future. A soulful, slice of disco from 1978, it’s a real hidden gem. Next up is Rena’s sassy, I Love Your Beat. Released in 1980, it melts seamlessly into Laura Taylor’s Some Love. It’s a real find, and shows how deep the Horse Meat Disco guys dig. This was the B-Side to Laura’s 1979 single All Through Me. After that, there’s only two tracks to go. Will Horse Meat Disco finish on a resounding high?

That proves to be the case. Briefly, Horse Meat Disco tease you with Joey Negro Vs. Horse Meat Disco’s Candidate For Love. They take the track in the direction of funk, before boogie, disco and house melt into one. Then finishing Horse Meat Disco Volume IV on a resounding high is Camouflage’s Bee Sting. It brings this musical journey to sassy, soulful, symphonic and dance-floor friendly crescendo. Mind you, what do you expect from Horse Meat Disco, purveyors of top quality dance-floor friendly music. Not only that, but their musical taste is impeccable. Proof of that can be found on disc two of Horse Meat Disco Volume IV.

DISC TWO.

Disc two of Horse Meat Disco Volume IV features just twelve tracks. That’s purely down to time constraints. However, these twelve tracks ooze quality. They include classics, hidden gems and rarities. There’s even a B-side thrown in for good measure on Disc two of Horse Meat Disco Volume IV, which I’ll tell you about.

Opening Disc two of Horse Meat Disco Volume IV is OPAL’s Ain’t No Way. Released in 1983, on Silver Cloud Records, it was written by Phil Barr and mixed by Edward Colon. This is a track that shows how dance music had changed since disco died in July 1979. Gone are the lush strings and rasping horns of the disco orchestra. Replacing them, are banks of synths and a sassy, strutting, soulful vocal. The result is a  feisty slice of boogie.

K.S.B. released Misaluba on the Italian label Empire Records in 1983. It’s a real fusion of influences. One minute there’s a sci-fi influence, the next, there’s an Afro-beat influenced chant. Then there’s trippy, mysterious synths. They play their part in a hypnotic, lysergic boogie track.

The Sunburst Band released The Secret Life Of Us in July 2012, on Z Records. It featured the soulful delights of Taste The Groove. The soulfulness comes from strutting, diva-esque vocal. However, there’s more than soul to Taste The Groove. It’s a track that’s funky, dance-floor friendly and full of hooks.

Valery Allington released Stop in 1982, on the Italian label Musix. Stop was recorded and mixed at R.G. Studio, Vincenza, Italy. Producing Stop was Sangy. From the get-go, Stop reminds me of early seventies Stevie Wonder given an eighties makeover. Stabs of horns join the funky rhythm section in creating a track that’s joyous and truly irresistible.

Shahid Mustaf MC’s Getting To Know MC was released back in 2012. The version included is the Funked Over Mix. The arrangement is best described as uber funky, hypnotic, with an eighties influence. It’s a case of back to the future. Synths, drum machines and a funky bass accompanying the vocal on this eighties inspired dance track.

L’Amour featuring Krystal released Let’s Make Love Tonight on Broccoli Rabe Records, back in 1984. It’s a funky, soulful boogie track, with a twist. The twist is the harmonica that drifts in and out of the arrangement. What makes the track is Krystal’s vocal. Quite simply,  it’s at the heart of the track’s success. It’s sassy, seductive and breathy and vital to the success of this hidden gem.

By 1979, Ismael Angel Ledesma had played on numerous disco, funk and soul tracks. Now was the time for him to release his debut album, Ish. It wasreleased on the Clouds’ label in 1979. One of the highlights of Ish was Don’t Stop. It’s a fusion of boogie, disco, funk, soul and sci-fi synths. Don’t Stop was the perfect showcase for Ish’s guitar playing and showed the way dance music was heading.

Joey Negro Vs. Horse Meat Disco’s Candidate For Love has everything you want in a dance-track. It was released on Record Store Day 2014 as a limited edition 12” single. Here. Joey Negro and the Horse Meat Disco guys musical tastes shine through.They take the track in the direction of funk, before boogie, disco and house melt into one. The result is a homage to the music that’s inspired Joey Negro and the Horse Meat Disco.

Cleavage’s only single was Barah, which they released in 1987, on Studio Records. The version on Horse Meat Disco IV is the Sampled Version. Produced by Archie Lucas and Tyrone “Tito” Robinson, they combine elements of funk, Latin, electronica and house. There’s even some searing rocky guitar licks. They’re added to the myriad of percussion and hypnotic beats. Later, the track takes a cinematic twist as Cleavage spring another surprise on this eclectic track.

Rena released Love Your Beat (Play It Again Sam) in 1980, on Factory Beat Records. It’s a fusion of dance music’s past and future. By that, I mean disco and boogie. Disco had died in 1979, with boogie seen as dance music’s future. Written and produced by Billy Nichols, mostly, it’s disco that’s to the fore. Lush disco strings sweep Reena along, while horns rasp. Later, bubbling synths add a hint of boogie, before Reena unleashes a sensual, vampish vocal on what’s a glorious reminder of the heady days of the disco and boogie eras.

Laura Taylor’s Some Love was the B-Side to Laura’s 1979 single All Through Me. It was released on T.K. Records, and is a delicious fusion of disco, funk and soul. Some Love is a real find. Its string drenched arrangement sweeps Laura’s tender, needy vocal along. Horns growl, the rhythm section add the heartbeat and cooing harmonies accompany Laura. When all this is combined, the result is one of the real highlights of Horse Meat Disco IV.

Closing Horse Meat Disco IV is Camouflage’s Bee Sting. It was released in 1977, on State Records. This was at the height of the disco era. Camouflage are responsible for this eight minute symphonic epic. It’s a musical journey par excellence. It’s sassy, soulful, symphonic and dance-floor friendly, and is the perfect way to close Horse Meat Disco IV. Quite simply, it’s a case of keeping the best until last.

Just like the three previous volumes of Horse Meat Disco, Horse Meat Disco IV doesn’t disappoint. Far from it. The Horse Meat Disco collective back and better than ever. They’ve dug deep and come up with music that’s funky, soulful and dance-floor friendly. That’s what we’ve come to expect from the Horse Meat Disco collective. Their raison d’être is filling dance-floors worldwide. They’ll do that with the music on Horse Meat Disco IV which will be released on Strut Records on 16th June. 

No wonder. Horse Meat Disco IV is full of tracks guaranteed to fill dance-floors. Horse Meat Disco take chances. They eschew the predictable for hidden gems, rarities and even one of the best B-sides I’ve heard in a long time, Laura Taylor’s Some Love. It’s one of the highlights of Horse Meat Disco IV. So is Rena’s Love Your Beat (Play It Again Sam). It’ll ensure that even the most reticent dancer will be heading for the dance-floor. Other tracks are funky, hook-laden, hypnotic,  joyous, sassy and soulful. Most importantly, all the tracks on Horse Meat Disco IV are dance-floor friendly.

This is regardless of whether it’s  boogie, disco, electro and house. Hidden gems, rarities and classics sit side-by-side on Horse Meat Disco IV, which is the best instalment in the Horse Meat Disco series. So much so, that Horse Meat Disco IV is guaranteed to get any party started and fill dance-floors everywhere.

HORSE MEAT DISCO VOLUME IV.

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