DANIELE CIULINI-DOMESTIC EXILE (COLLECTED WORKS 82-86).

DANIELE CIULINI-DOMESTIC EXILE (COLLECTED WORKS 82-86).

Nowadays, the word innovator is used far too often. However, in Daniele Ciullini’s case, it’s a fitting description of a groundbreaking musician. The music on his forthcoming compilation, Domestic Exile is proof of that. Domestic Exile is the first reissue to be released on the Ecstatic label on sixth April 2015. Domestic Exile (Collected Works 82-86) is the perfect introduction to Daniele Ciullini’s music. 

Domestic Exile features a total sixteen innovative tracks. These tracks were released in the eighties. They were way ahead of their time. In fact, it’s hard to believe that Daniele Ciullini released the music on Domestic Exile (Collected Works 82-86), between 1982 and 1986. It’s no exaggeration to say that, Daniele Ciullini’s music was way ahead of the curve. Sadly, it was never heard by a wider audience. 

There’s a reason for that. Daniele Ciullini self-released his music. He released his music on cassette, and it sold by way of word of mouth. Mostly, Daniele Ciullini’s music was only heard by a small discerning group of music lovers. However, some journalists familiar with the groundbreaking TRAX collective discovered Daniele Ciullini’s music. Sadly, despite their efforts to promote Daniele Ciullini’s music, it remained one of the best kept secrets of the Italian music scene in the eighties. 

Now, nearly thirty years later, recently there’s been a resurgence in interest in Daniele Ciullini’s music. This resurgence in interest began in 2012, when thirty years after he released his debut single, Oxidized Sounds in 1982, Daniele Ciullini returned with his Il Bacio Della Sirena E.P. It was released on the Italian label Quantum Bit. At last, Daniele Ciullini was back what he did best, making music. For the Florence born musician, it was welcome return.

Daniele Ciullini was born and brought up in Florence, Italy. From an early age, Daniele Ciullini was interested in music and art. It soon became his passion. So, it was no surprise when Daniele Ciullini joined the groundbreaking TRAX collective. 

The TRAX collective were a  pan-European collaboration network. Artists and musicians throughout Europe, were able to exchange ideas, and if they wanted, collaborate on art and musical projects. For a generation of artists and musicians, this increased connectivity across borders. 

Suddenly, new opportunities arose for musicians. Now it was possible for an Italian musician like Daniele Ciullini, to collaborate with musicians in other parts of Europe. It was an exciting time in the pre-internet age, and was a godsend for musical innovators, including Daniele Ciullini who played an important part in the TRAX collective. Similarly, the TRAX collective would help him promote his music. 

The early eighties was a very different time. This was way before the birth of the internet and social media networks. Computers were in their infancy. So was the new music technology.

As the eighties began to unfold, Daniele Ciullini realised he wanted to experiment musically. He was fortunate, that the new music technology was now within the budget of an aspiring musician. Drum machines, sequencers and synths although still expensive, had recently come down in price. No longer were they just found in recording studios. No. Now an aspiring musician like Daniele Ciullini could use them to record an album. He could do this at home, without the expense of hiring a recording studio. That’s what Daniele Ciullini decided to do in 1982.

Of the sixteen tracks on the Domestic Exile (Collected Works 82-86) compilation, the first eight tracks comprise the original Domestic Exile album. Opening Domestic Exile was Violet, an understated, spacey, minimalist track. There’s a darkness, and even, a sense of hopelessness. This is reflection of the early eighties for many young Europeans. 

From there, Marbles In The Garden is a pulsating proto-techno track. It shows another side to Daniele Ciullini. It’s almost a hands in the air, fist pumping dance track. Thirty years later, it’s sure to light up a dance-floor.

Trance is aptly titled. Its lo-fi, hypnotic sound is almost mesmeric. Daniele fuses the nascent musical technology to good effect, creating an innovative industrial sounding track.

If carbon dating was used on Lipstick On The Glasses, it would date the track to circa 1982, 1983. Musically, it’s reminiscent of that era. It takes you back to a time and place. Again, there’s a lo-fi sound, as the bouncy, pulsating and crackling synths join drums that crack. They create a cinematic sounding track.

Decadence has a thoughtful, pensive sound. The arrangement is almost dark and bleak. It’s as if it’s how Daniele Ciullini sees the world, and his future.

Distant drums pound and pulsate, while synth bound and bubble on Naked And White. Others have a moody, sci-fi sound. Together, they create captivating cinematic sounding track. Just like previous tracks, it’s inventive and sees Daniele push musical boundaries.

Flowers In The Water is another track with a sci-fi sounding arrangement. Just synths and drum machines are deployed by Daniele. Just like previous tracks, everything is improvised. This could’ve gone badly wrong. It doesn’t. He creates a bubbling, meandering and sometimes persistent sounding arrangement. Its unapologetically lo-fi in sound. Despite that, it’s melodic and memorable, and has aged remarkably well. 

The Shadow Whisper closes the Domestic Exile album. It’s a shock to the system. Straight away, there’s a sharpness to the arrangement. Drums literally crack like whips. They’re joined by sci-fi synths. They fill the gaps, beeping and squeaking, proving yin to the drums yang.

Daniele Ciullini’s 1983 debut album Domestic Exile showcased an innovative musician, as he embarked upon his career. Over eight short tracks, Daniele Ciullini was determined to push musical boundaries to their limits, sometimes, way beyond. That’s what he did. The music on Domestic Exile was variously broody, challenging, dance-floor friendly, ethereal, innovative, lo-fi, melancholy and reflective. The music was also cinematic. 

For anyone growing up in Europe in 1983, it paints a picture of what the continent was like. With much of Europe in the throes of a recession, poverty, unemployment and unrest were rife. Daniele Ciullini was a realist. He was determined to paint a picture of Europe circa 1983. That’s why the music veers between bleak, broody and dance-floor friendly, to ethereal and reflective. While many Europeans suffered, others celebrated. It was a time of great inequality and injustice. Many people had nothing to celebrate. That’s apparent on Domestic Exile,  Daniele Ciullini’s genre-melting portrayal of early eighties Europe.

Domestic Exile was a fusion of ambient, avant-garde, experimental, electronica and industrial music. These musical genres are combined by Daniele Ciullini over Domestic Exile’s eight tracks. They caught the imagination not just of the TRAX collective, but people who could relate to Domestic Exile. This would be the case with the rest of the music on Domestic Exile (Collected Works 82-86).

The rest of Domestic Exile (Collected Works 82-86) features on various compilations released by various labels. This includes two tracks released on compilations during 1983.

Deep Water featured the Hate’s Our Belief compilation. It was released in 1983 as a double cassette, on the Italian label Aquilifer Sodality. The same year, 1983, Daniele’s dark, dramatic industrial track Bloody Machine featured on the Italiano Industriale compilation. This compilation was released by the Area Condizionata label, and helped spread the word about Daniele’s music.

During 1984,  three of Daniele Ciullini’s tracks featured on compilations. Marbles In A Garden featured on The Other Side Of Futurism compilation. Chinese Program featured on Grand Trax, a compilation released by the TRAX collective. The third compilation Daniele Ciullini featured on, was the Nouances compilation. It featured Silence, which features on Domestic Exile (Collected Works 82-86). After a busy 1984, there was not letup during 1985.

The TRAX collective released another compilation in 1985. This was the Neoist Ghosts compilation. It featured Dead Aids, a collaboration with Vivenza. Theme, another of Daniele’s tracks featured on L’Enfer Est Intime-Volume Général, which was released by the French label VP231. For Daniele, this meant his music was finding an audience outside his native Italy. Surely, Daniele Ciullini’s star was in the ascendancy?

A year later, in 1986, French electronic experimental label Actéon were compiling L’Archange Enflammé Vol. B. They decided that Daniele Ciullini’s Silence 3 should feature on the compilation. It’s another track on the forthcoming compilation Domestic Exile (Collected Works 82-86). However, after the release of L’Archange Enflammé Vol. B very little was heard of Daniele Ciullini.

Another twenty-six years passed before Daniele Ciullini released any more music. This coincided with a resurgence in interest in Daniele Ciullini’s music. So in 2012, thirty years after he released his debut single, Oxidized Sounds, Daniele Ciullini returned with his Il Bacio Della Sirena E.P. It was released on the Italian label Quantum Bit. At last, Daniele Ciullini was back what he did best, making music.

Two years later, and Daniele Ciullini returned with his long-awaited sophomore album. This was Resti, which was released by the Portugal based netlabel, founded by Portuguese musician João Ricardo. Resti had been a long time coming, but was worth the while. Daniele Ciullini had matured as a musician since the release of Domestic Exile in 1982. However, one thing remained the same, Daniele Ciullini’s ability to create innovative music.

That had been the story of Daniele Ciullini’s career. The music on his forthcoming compilation, Domestic Exile is proof of that. Domestic Exile (Collected Works 82-86) is the first reissue to be released on the Ecstatic label on sixth April 2015.  It’s the perfect introduction to Daniele Ciullini’s music.

The sixteen tracks on Domestic Exile (Collected Works 82-86) show Daniele Ciullini maturing as an artist. Throughout this four year period, Daniele Ciullini’s music continued to evolve. As a result, Daniele Ciullini’s music was way ahead of its time. Back then, Italian “mail-artist” Daniele Ciullini was pushing musical boundaries to their limits.

As a result, Daniele Ciullini’s music was variously broody, challenging, cinematic, dance-floor friendly, ethereal, innovative, lo-fi, melancholy and reflective.  It’s a fusion of musical genres. Elements of ambient, avant-garde, experimental, electronica and industrial music can be heard on the forthcoming compilation, Domestic Exile. That’s not all. There’s also a proto-techno sound on Marbles In A Garden. Thirty-two years later, this hands in the air anthem will still fill a dance-floor. It’s also proof that thirty-two years after Daniele Ciullini released his debut album Domestic Exile, the music on the forthcoming Domestic Exile (Collected Works 82-86) compilation is still innovative, influential and relevant.

DANIELE CIULINI-DOMESTIC EXILE (COLLECTED WORKS 82-86).

daniele ciulini

 

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