A PROJECTION-FRAMEWORK.

A PROJECTION-FRAMEWORK.

Two years after releasing their critically acclaimed debut album Exit, Stockholm based A Projection recently returned with their much-anticipated sophomore album Framework. It was released by the Hamburg-based label Tapete Records. They were one of the record labels in the race to sign A Projection after hearing their eponymous debut EP. Eventually, Tapete Records won the signature of A Projection, because they were able to offer them total creative freedom. This was something many labels are reluctant to do. However, this paid off for Tapete Records as A Projection are one of the rising stars of European music.

The A Projection story began in Stockholm in 2013. That was when the five local musicians decided to have one last throw of the dice musically. They had all been involved in bands before, but had never made a breakthrough. It looked as if the dream of becoming a member of a successful band was over. So the future members of A Projection settled into careers away from music.

Gradually, the five musicians found themselves enjoying successful careers. They were all living comfortably but still, there was something missing from their lives…music. Deep down, they were still a yearning to make music. Eventually, they decided to have one last roll of the dice with A Projection. 

This time, they were going to commit to the project 100%. There would be no regrets. Instead, the five members of A Projection were going to commit fully to the band. This meant turning their back on climbing the corporate ladder to follow their dream.  

When the members of A Projection made this announcement, colleagues, friends and families must have questioned the wisdom of this decision. They were giving the security of a full time job to join a band. Surely this was a precarious existence? However, those sitting in judgement have never experienced the adrenaline rush of taking to the stage with a band and winning them over. Soon, A Projection would.

Having made the decision to turn their back on their career, A Projection was formed. It had been born out of desperation and a necessity to express themselves musically. To do this, A Projection began combining dark, eighties post punk with vibrant indie rock and electronic music as they honed their sound. Before long, A Projection were ready to make their debut in Stockholm’s vibrant underground music scene.

After making their live debut, it didn’t take long before A Projection had established a reputation as one of Stockholm’s up-and-coming live bands. No wonder. A Projection’s early performances were a combination of energy and enthusiasm with power and passion. Driven along by their rhythm section, A Projection combined stacks of synths with effects laden guitars and a vocal that bristled with emotion.  Their genre-defying sound caught the attention of music fans. Soon, the word was out, A Projection were a band  going places.

As A Projection continued to hone their sound, their concerts continued to be memorable. Night after night, they unleashed music that was variously atmospheric, dark, dense, powerful and sinister. This they played against a backdrop of evocative videos. It was a potent combination, and one that made A Projection standout from the crowd.

No wonder. The five members of A Projection were determined and desperate to make a success of the band. They had sacrificed so much.Freed from the corporate shackles, they were living the dream as they took to the stage  each night.Sometimes, though there was an unpredictability and violence erupted in the audience. This veterans of the Stockholm music scene said this was the spirit of ’76, and what happened when the Sex Pistols played live. However, there was one major difference, A Projection were talented musicians.

This wasn’t going unnoticed. Some onlookers felt that A Projection would soon outgrow the local Stockholm music scene. They were definitely destined for bigger and better things. Especially after A Projection released their eponymous demo EP.

A Projection sent their newly recorded demo to various record company. They were impressed by A Projection’s demo EP. This resulted in several record companies chasing the signature of A Projection. For the five members of A Projection, their decision to turn their back on the corporate world had been vindicated. They were about to sign their first recording contract.

By then, A Projection had decided to sign a recording contract with the Hamburg-based label Tapete Records. They offered A Projection total creative freedom. This was something many record companies are reluctant to offer bands. However, Tapete Records realised that by doing so, A Projection would reward them with a very special album.

Exit.

That proved to be the case. Tapete Records were richly rewarded when A Projection returned with their genre-defying debut album Exit. Elements of indie rock, post punk and electronica were combined by A Projection on Exit which features gems like Exit, Reborn, Another Face and This Is Not Me. 

When Exit was released in May 2015, it was to widespread critical acclaim. It was heartfelt, honest and to some extent a very personal album. Critics forecast that A Projection had a big future ahead of them. Comparisons were drawn also with The Editors, The Cure, The Swans, and Depeche Mode. A Projection’s star was definitely in the ascendancy as their music began to reach a much wider audience.

Since then, A Projection have been wining friends with their unique, genre-melting sound. However, A Projection have also been busy writing and recording their sophomore album Framework.

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Framework.

After writing thirteen new songs, A Projection headed to Redmount Studios in Stockholm. That was where they recorded Framework with Niklas Berglöf. Once the album was complete, it was mixed by the award-winning mix engineer Magnus Lindberg. The next step was for A Projection to deliver Framework to Tapete Records.

They discovered an album where the classic post-punk sound is combined with modern indie rock. It’s a potent, pleasing and accessible album that still has a defiant sound. Given the post punk influence that’s no surprise. However, that’s just part of the story of A Projection’s much-anticipated sophomore album Framework.

Framework opens with Hands, where A Projection briefly toy with the listener. Soon, though, the arrangement explodes melodically into life. Guitars ring out, as they join with synths and the rhythm section in driving the arrangement along. The final piece of the jigsaw is a swaggering, spirit of ’76 vocal. It’s the perfect addition. Later, when the vocal drops out at 1.47, A Projection showcase their considerable talents. They’re a tight and talented band who sound as if they’ve been together longer than four years. When the vocal returns, drums crack as guitars ring out, and power the arrangement along. Backing vocals and later synths are added, as this irresistible genre-melting track  heads towards a crescendo.

Guitars rings out as drums pound as Dark City unfolds. Soon, ethereal, glacial are added. They add a contrast. So does the lead emotive, heartfelt lead vocal. It’s accompanied by chugging guitars, the rhythm section and glacial synths that drift in and out. Again, hooks haven’t been spared in what’s a memorable and hopeful, eighties inspired anthem.

Straight away, it’s obvious that something special is unfolding on Transition. Drums crack while the arrangement to Transition pulsates. Jangling guitars are swathes of elegiac, pastoral synths. They sweep and glide along, their ethereal sound accompanying an urgent, impassioned and thoughtful vocal. It bristles with emotion as memories come flooding back. Later, a searing guitar is added and cuts through a multi-layered arrangement that manages to be dramatic and ethereal simultaneously. It plays its part in what’s a beautiful and poignant fusion of indie rock, post punk and electronica.

Dubby and deliberate describes the introduction to Sensible Ends. A glistening synth is joined by a drum that cracks and reverberates. Soon, the bass and guitar increase the tempo, and this is the signal for A Projection to kick loose. By the time they’re in full flight they’ve been joined by the vocal. Again, it sounds as if it has been influenced by any number of British bands of the eighties. Meanwhile, thunderous drums, layers of synths and chirping, searing guitar licks accompany the vocal as the arrangement gallops along. It’s an impressive and stirring sound, and one that’s sure to evoke memories of the eighties. 

The same could be said of Scattered. Synths and guitars help the rhythm section power the arrangement. Soon, an urgent and emotive vocal enters. Meanwhile, the drums provide a 4/4 beat as the synths and jangling guitars play an important part in the sound and success of Scattered. When the vocal drops out at 1.48, a mesmeric bass, stabs of synths and drums that crack enjoy their moment in the sun. Before long, the vocal returns and the with rest of A Projection powers the arrangement to its memorable high.

I’m Not Here is very different to previous tracks. That’s apparent from opening notes, where a prowling bass synth combines with drums. They’re joined by a despairing vocal. Much later, washes of glacial synths are added to this soul-baring ballad where eighties electronica meets post punk.

No Light marks a return a much more familiar sound. A fleet fingered bass solo sets the scene for the rest of the band. Soon, A Projection are in full flight. The only thing that’s missing is the vocal. It enters after forty seconds. Suddenly, everything has fallen into place. With guitars, synths and the rhythm section for company, another anthemic eighties’ inspired  track unfolds.

Machine gun licks open Next Time, before the thunderous rhythm section and synths drive the arrangement along. It’s a melodic and memorable combination. Especially when the urgent hurt-filled vocal enters. It assures that: “Next Time there won’t be a Next Time.” Hooks it seems, haven’t been spared. Meanwhile, the arrangement glides along effortlessly along. Jittery and later, glacial synths play a starring role. So do scorching and post punk guitar riffs. However, it’s the vocal that steals the show in this hook-laden fusion of electronica, indie rock, pop and post punk, 

Bristling, jangling guitars open For Another Day, before the arrangement bursts into life. The rhythm section never miss a beat, as searing guitars accompany a hurt-filled, rueful vocal. Soon, elegiac synths are added, and glide across the arrangement. Later, backing vocals augment the vocal, before the vocal drops out at 1.56. This allows the rest of the band to stretch their legs. When the vocal return, A Projection reach new heights on this three minute indie rock anthem.

A Projection seem to specialise in three minute songs that tell a story. Betrayal is no different. The rhythm section provide a galloping backdrop as blistering guitars are unleashed. They set the scene for the vocal that’s been betrayed. It’s sometimes augmented by backing vocals that add to the post punk sound. Later, elegiac synths add a contrast. Mostly, though, it’s the rhythm section and guitars that provide the backdrop for a hurt-filled vocal still reeling from the Betrayal.

There’s a brief nod to Siouxsie and The Banshees in the introduction Hollow Eyes. This comes courtesy of the lone guitar that accompanies the deliberate vocal. It’s a mixture of despair and hurt. Meanwhile, the arrangement begins to unfold. Sweeping synths join the rhythm section and guitar in driving the eighties inspired arrangement along. It’s a melodic mixture of electronica, indie rock and post punk that features some of the most moving lyrics on Framework.

Not for the first time, A Projection sound like The Smiths on Briefly Breach. The rhythm have the foot to the floor, as bristling guitars and ethereal synths combine. They provide the backdrop for vocal. It’s briefly panned left, and is moved back in the mix, resulting in a distant sound. This is used throughout what’s one of the highlights of Framework. As the vocal drops out, a freewheeling A Projection lock into a groove and sometimes, are reminiscent of The Cult. Meanwhile, A Projection  sound as if they’re enjoying themselves. The occasional whoop is a giveaway, as A Projection reach new heights.

Dark and dramatic describes Listen To The Dark which closes Framework. Drums reverberate before a dark, deliberate vocal enters. It’s joined by eerie backing vocals, lumbering synths and a scrabbled guitar. When they’re combined, this shows a very different and dark side to Framework.

Not for the first time, A Projection sound like The Smiths on Briefly Breach. The rhythm have the foot to the floor, as bristling guitars and ethereal synths combine. They provide the backdrop for vocal. It’s briefly panned left, and is moved back in the mix, resulting in a distant sound. This is used throughout what’s one of the highlights of Framework. As the vocal drops out, a freewheeling A Projection lock into a groove and sometimes, are reminiscent of The Cult. Meanwhile, A Projection  sound as if they’re enjoying themselves. The occasional whoop is a giveaway, as A Projection reach new heights.

Dark and dramatic describes Listen To The Dark which closes Framework. Drums reverberate before a dark, deliberate vocal enters. It’s joined by eerie backing vocals, lumbering synths and a scrabbled guitar. When they’re combined, this shows a very different and dark side to Framework.

After nearly two years, A Projection return with their much-anticipated sophomore album Framework. It was recently released by Hamburg based Tapete Records, and features the triumphant return of Stockholm based A Projection.

They seamlessly combined elements of electronica with indie rock, pop, post punk and punk on Framework. It features thirteen tracks, including genre-melting, hook-laden anthems aplenty. This includes Dark City, No Light, Next Time and For Another Day, Other times, A Projection showcase their versatility and take Framework in different directions. This includes on I’m Not Here, where eighties electronica and post punk combine to create a soul-baring ballad. Then there’s the poignant, genre-melting Transition. It shows A Projection’s ability to seamlessly combine disparate musical genres. This they do throughout Framework.

Sometimes though, it’s possible to hear some of the music that has inspired and influenced A Projection. This includes Depeche Mode, New Order, Siouxsie and The Banshees, The Cult, The Cure, The Dditors, The Smiths and The Swans. However, the inspiration of these bands becomes part of something much bigger.

That is Framework, A Projection’s much-anticipated sophomore album. It marks the coming of age of A Projection, who were formed just four years ago. They’ve come a long a way since them, and look destined for much bigger things. Especially if A Projection continue to record albums like Framework, which features melodic and memorable music, where hook-laden anthems sit side-by-side with beautiful ballads and eighties inspired tracks. 

A PROJECTION-FRAMEWORK.

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