SHE’S A DOLL! WARNER BROS’ FEMININE SIDE.

She’s A Doll!-Warner Bros’ Feminine Side.

Label: Ace Records.

One of Ace Records’ most popular compilation series’ over the past few years has been Where The Girls Are. There’s already been nine volumes of the critically acclaimed Where The Girls Are, with another due for release in 2019. This hasn’t stopped Ace Records compiling and releasing another new compilation of girl pop, but one with a difference.

This is She’s A Doll!-Warner Bros’ Feminine Side, which has just been released by Ace Records. It features twenty-four tracks which were released by Warner Bros and its various imprints between 1962 and 1968. These tracks  feature She’s A Doll!-Warner Bros’ Feminine Side, which could well be first instalment in a series of label-centric compilations of girl-pop.

If so, what better label to start than Warner Bros, which was home to everyone from The Three Degrees, Vickie Baines, Barbara Jackson, Ramona King, The Dolls, Bonnie, Connie Stevens,  The Honeys, Brenda Hall, Barbara English and Joyce Alexander to Lorraine Ellison. With a mixture of familiar faces and new names, She’s A Doll!-Warner Bros’ Feminine Side has something for everyone.

This includes Contact which The Three Degrees, who open She’s A Doll!-Warner Bros’ Feminine Side with Contact, a smooth slice of Philly Soul released as a single on Warner Bros Seven Arts in 1968. Sadly, this was The Three Degrees one and only single for Warner Bros Seven Arts, and it wasn’t until they signed to Gamble and Huff’s Philadelphia International Records in the seventies  that they enjoyed commercial success on both sides of the Atlantic.

Philly born Vickie Baines recorded and released two singles on Parkway in 1965, and two years later released Sweeter Than Sweet Things in 1967 on the Symbol label. Tucked away on the B-Side was the hidden gem We Can Find That Love. It was pickled up by Loma, an imprint of Warner Bros who released We Can Find That Love as a single. Sadly, this hidden soulful gem failed to find the audience it deserved, and fifty-one years is a welcome addition to She’s A Doll!-Warner Bros’ Feminine Side.

Barbara Jackson only released two singles during a recording career which began in 1963 and was over by 1965. Her finest hour came at Warner Bros where she recorded and released He’s Good in 1965. Alas, commercial success eluded She’s Good and that marked the end of Barbara Jackson’s short recording career. Her story is a case of what might have been.

Ramona King recorded for various labels during her career, and between 1964 to 1965 was signed to Warner Bros and recorded Chico’s Girl. However, it was never released and makes a belated debut on She’s A Doll!-Warner Bros’ Feminine Side.

With the rise of popularity in girl groups The Socialites were formed in 1960, and released a trio of singles. This included their swan-song You’re Losing Your Touch which was released in 1964. It featured Jive Jimmy on the B-Side, which is a reminder of the early sixties girl group sound. Sadly, the single failed commercially and The Socialites called time on their career not long after releasing You’re Losing Your Touch. Maybe things would’ve been different if Jive Jimmy had been released as a single?

Movie and television star Connie Stevens embarked upon a musical career in the early sixties and in 1963, released the double A side Little Miss Understood and There Goes Your Guy. While the single failed to chart,There  Goes Your Guy is regarded as one of Connie Stevens’ finest sides. 

He’s A Doll was The Honeys sophomore single and was released on Warner Bros in 1964. By then, one of The Honeys, Marilyn Rowell, and  Beach Boy Brian Wilson were engaged and married shortly after the release of He’s A Doll. However, commercial success eluded He’s A Doll and The Honeys began working as backing vocalists, and only released one further single in 1969. However, their finest single was He’s A Doll.

Sugar N’ Spice’s single Come Go With Me was the Loma label’s first venture into the girl group market. It wasn’t a successful one, although the B-Side Playboy is something of a hidden gem.

Nashville born Brenda Hall only ever released one single during her career. This came in 1965, when she  released Soldier Boy Of Mine on Loma. On the B-Side was Oh Eddy, My Baby which was a death song inspired by The Shangri-Las. It’s another oft-overlooked song from the Warner Bros’ vaults.

Prior to founding Sly and The Family Stone, Sly and Rose stone were members of The Tonettes. In 1964,Gloria Scott and The Tonettes released I Taught Him (Pt 1) as a single which failed to chart. The following year, Gloria Scott was hired by Ike Turner which spelt the end of the group, which was part of the story of Sly and The Family Stone.

Joyce Alexander’s one and single Here I Come was released on Warner Bros in 1963. Sadly, there was no followup from this truly talented singer. That was a great shame.

Closing She’s A Doll!-Warner Bros’ Feminine Side is In My Tomorrow by Philly born Lorraine Ellison. It was released as a single on Loma in 1968, and is a soulful reminder of the talented Lorraine Ellison.

After the success of the critically acclaimed Where The Girls Are compilation series, Ace Records have just released  another new compilation of girl pop,She’s A Doll!-Warner Bros’ Feminine Side. It features twenty-four tracks which were released by Warner Bros and its various imprints between 1962 and 1968 by familiar faces and new names. They all have one thing in common their quality.

Given the quality of the tracks on She’s A Doll!-Warner Bros’ Feminine Side, this could well be first instalment in a series of label-centric compilations of girl-pop and another success story for Ace Records.

She’s A Doll!-Warner Bros’ Feminine Side.

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